Twitter’s Customer Service Secret Revealed

Author: Erin Media April 6, 2010
Let’s say you have a problem with Twitter. Like, for instance, someone has registered your company or product name and pretends to be you. You must get them shut down…and now! As Twitter becomes a topic of conversation in board rooms the world over, Twitter has weighed in with “Twitter 101 for Business.” It’s a decent overview—and will be a huge help in creating those slides for the board presentation—but lacks the specificity needed to really wrangle your brand in the Twitterverse. If you’ve ever tried to get customer service from Twitter, you know it’s a frustrating loop.  They only have 138 employees!  So you click Contact and Customer Support, and you find yourself in FAQs devoid of contact info. Press Enquiries leads to a contact form, but between us chickens, you’re not press covering Twitter so you don’t really want to use that. Which leaves a postal address. Go ahead…write them a letter…dare you…better yet, pop on over to Folsom Street and say hi! Twitter doesn’t hire overseers awaiting instruction from you. If you have a question about how to use a function of Twitter, there’s plenty of info available, and of course you can always just ask your PR agency (if they don’t have an answer for you, ask us). But if you have a REAL problem, one keeping you awake at night, you need to contact Twitter directly. Good news: there is a wizard behind the curtain. Here’s how to find him: 1. Start at the beginning. If your question is not answered, proceed to… (This gets tricky…pay attention…) 2. Click Check Your Existing Requests and log in 3. When you get to the screen that says you have no open requests, go to the menu bar of your browser and enter this address: http://help.twitter.com/requests/new 4. Fill in the form and click Submit And wait. And wait. And wait some more. They’re notoriously slow.  You can check the site for response to your query, and you will also be notified when Twitter responds via email—to the address associated with the Twitter user name you logged in with above. Meanwhile, what do you do about those nefarious Twitizens who keep messing with your communications? That’s for another installment of this newsletter. If you need a preview, drop us a line. We are all about giving things to those who ask us.